Sydney prog-rockers Glass Ocean have released their anthemic debut album, The Remnants of Losing Yourself In Someone Else
14.09.2020

Sydney prog-rockers Glass Ocean have released their anthemic debut album, The Remnants of Losing Yourself In Someone Else

Photo by Electrum Photography
Words by Alex Callan

Established in early 2014, Glass Ocean have risen to become one of Sydney's exciting progressive rock talents.

After two revered EP’s, Sydney prog-rockers Glass Ocean have released their debut album, the anthemic and melodic The Remnants of Losing Yourself In Someone Else, out now via Wild Things Records.

With intricate off kilter drum patterns found on ‘Voyage’, it’s no surprise that Nic Petterson, an ex founding member, had his hand in co-writing the album. Akin to Petterson’s individualistic percussive stylings in Northlane, the entire song is dictated by the drumming. More than just keeping tempo,the drumming constantly feels as if it’s two beats ahead of the rest of the song and whatever direction the drums take as does the song. Although that does not discredit the meticulous and impressive instrumentation by every member.

‘Beyond Us’ highlights Tobias Atkins epic ‘Baroness’ styled vocals which are further strengthened by the song’s reverb which creates really cool echoes at moments, such as the bridge, which also has a kind of A Dire Straits vibe to the guitars.

With its rain droplet audio, a slow melodic build I actually feel as if ‘Soul Slumber’ makes for a very appropriate album opener. But it was kind of around ‘Soul Slumber’ and ‘Bolero’ that I found my only real criticism of this album.

I feel as if a lot of the songs are structured to be this consistent gentle rise, which is really quite unique, but it rarely builds to anything. I understand that unlike bands such as Circles which also features a lot of the same members, Glass Ocean are not aiming for a heavy approach but I kept waiting for the songs build-up to lead to a moment greater than what you are being teased and it simply didn’t.

On the groups EP ‘II’, songs like ‘Val’ still have a very soft, subdued approach, but with rawness in the bass and more of a rock than pop approach.

Whilst I admire Glass Ocean’s musicality and technique, this direction bored me more than any of their previous work.

I’m not sure if it is a result of the band trying something more subtle or the album’s production and mixing making each instrument too lacklustre in their output, but the slowed down offerings wore thin as the album progressed.

2.5/5