Time to shine Geelong, people are growing mullets to raise funds for mental health research this September
02.09.2021

Time to shine Geelong, people are growing mullets to raise funds for mental health research this September

Peking Duk member Reuben Styles
Words by Talia Rinaldo

Business in the front, party in the back.

After gaining traction in the late ’70s and peaking in the ’80s, the mullet became one of the most iconic hairstyles of all time. While this short at the front, long at the back haircut has had its fair share of jokes, we’ve seen it slowly making its way back into fashion in recent times.

Suited to those who aren’t afraid to stray from the crowd and don’t take themselves too seriously, there’s now an official reason to grow the majestic hairstyle.

Black Dog Institute, the not-for-profit mental health medical research organisation, want you to shape and grow a mullet this month in the name of raising much-needed funds for mental health research with September being the official ‘Month of the Mullet’.

The key takeaways

  • Mullets for Mental Health is back this September
  • The Black Dog Institute is encouraging people to grow mullets to drive real change through ground-breaking research into early detection, prevention and treatment of common mental health disorders.
  • There are currently 12,037 mullets turning science into action across Australia, with donations coming in by the minute

Keep up with the latest in local news via our website.

In a similar vein to Movember, or the World’s Greatest Shave, the ‘Mullets For Mental Health’ initiative aims to start a conversation around mental health, and drive real change through ground-breaking research into early detection, prevention and treatment of common mental health disorders.

According to the Black Dog Institute, 60% of Australians who report symptoms of mental illness don’t seek help and suicide is the leading cause of death among Aussies aged 15 to 44.

With the need to come together now more than ever before in the midst of a pandemic, ‘Mullets For Mental Health’ are asking people to register to create your own mullet fundraising page to help change these statistics and raise money for the organisation through donations to the page. Brave participants are encouraged to spread the word and ask for support from everyone and anyone. Let them all know you are one of the brave humans rocking such a glorious hairstyle for mental health.

Better still, you can choose to take part as a team too, whether that be joining an existing team or rounding up some brave mates and making a team of your own.

There are a bunch of Aussie legends taking part this year who encourage you to join their team, including Peking Duk’s Reuben Styles (team Y.O.G.A), Dom Littrich from the band Pacific Avenue and as part of The Inspired Unemployed possy (team South Coast Mullet Men), or if you’re a footy fan you can join the three mulleteers Sam Nai-Smith, Nick Blakey and Justin McInerney from Sydney Swans on their team here.

Just choose your team and voilà, rock a mullet on a dream team!

 

 

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You may be sitting there thinking, ‘but how does growing a mullet do anything for mental health’? The answer is as simple as the mullet itself. Not only will your mullet will help the institute drive real change through groundbreaking research into the early detection, prevention and treatment of common mental health disorders due to the fundraising dollars, but the mullet itself starts conversations and leads to more awareness of not only the campaign but mental health in general.

Unlike some other NGOs which are government-funded, all the Black Dog Institute’s work is funded competitively, either through grants, fee-for-service income or generous donations like yours, making this all the more important.

Funds from previous mullet campaigns have gone towards rapidly adapting their free community and school programs into digital workshops and webinars and supporting their ongoing delivery; supporting their research, to better understand why some people at risk of suicide don’t seek help, and uncover better ways of reaching and assisting them; and helped them develop and trial of the new app for managing ongoing suicidal thoughts.

At the time of writing, there are currently 12,037 mullets turning science into action across Australia, with donations coming in by the minute. And while most of you are stuck at home in isolation, the institute has even been kind enough to share a guide on how to shape a mullet at home.

 

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Whether you’re aiming for the mane from music legend Joan Jett or even Miley Cyrus who sported the hairstyle, or you’re going for the dreamy Patrick Swayze do, or perhaps even the iconic Billy Ray Cyrus, this is something everyone can get involved in.

If you’re ready to become a mullet legend, or you’re just keen to get behind a mate, then visit the website.