Josh Seymour
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Josh Seymour

Known for his innate listening abilities, we had a chat to Josh Seymour about his upcoming show at Narana Unplugged II and having nowhere to hide as a performer.

Hi Josh, thanks for taking the time to chat with Forte magazine, how are you and what are you up to at the moment?

I am well, thank you. I have just fed my cat and we both seemed to be pleased with the outcome.

It’s been a little while since you released Rope Tied Hope, are you currently working on new music?

I am indeed. I am currently in the process of writing and demoing songs for a new album that will be recorded later in the year.

We understand listening and intuition are important skills for you, do you remember the first time you really honed in on these aspects of yourself?

That’s been the way since I first picked up a guitar as a young fella and started writing songs. I was told if I want to know how to write you have to read so I reckoned the same would go for music and listening. And you should always trust you instincts.

People have at times linked the word “loneliness” to your music, do you think that’s an accurate connection?

I’d say lonesomeness more than loneliness. I have been greatly influenced by the high lonesome singing of bill Monroe, skip James and the like. As well as a steady diet of Billie Holiday. Oh, and I am quite lonely… Will you be my friend?

We read an article in which it said you missed Texas, what do you think made you connect so much with the place?

I met some great people and made some great friends during my time in Texas. It’s an amazing place that makes music feel like home.

You’ll soon be playing at Narana Unplugged, and we’ve heard there’s a baby joey at the venue, are you big on animals? Think you’ll check it out?

Definitely. The first time I played there they had baby emus, which was awesome. I am very much looking forward to singing some songs with young joey

As for your set itself, and given it’s really stripped back and raw, is that a setting you’re most comfortable in or one that challenges you (as there’s absolutely no hiding for a musician)?

I feel far more comfortable with nowhere to hide, it comes with its own type of freedom. Although, it is a challenge to be stripped back without being bereft, if you can pull it off the reward is immense for performer and audience.

Thanks again for taking the time to chat with Forte, are there any last words of wisdom you’d like to leave with our readers?

If you can’t be good, be good at it.

When & Where: Narana Unplugged II at Narana Aboriginal Cultural Centre, Geelong – April 9

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