Barbecue baron Big Moe reveals the 10 things you never knew about competitive barbecue

Barbecue baron Big Moe reveals the 10 things you never knew about competitive barbecue

Big Moe Cason, the renowned king of barbecue, has spent over 10 years travelling the world perfecting his award winning ribs, sauces and brisket, and now he’s coming to Melbourne to share his mouth watering expertise.
In preparation for the much-anticipated return of Meatstock 2018, Big Moe has cleared the smoke to reveal 10 juicy facts about the art of barbecuing that you can really sink your teeth into.
1.Thermometers aren’t necessary
For the pros, Big Moe reveals that your sense of touch speaks for itself rather than the numbers on a thermometer. A thermometer may say the meat is cooked but Big Moe says the feel and the jiggle of the meat is the key to knowing when you’ve achieved the perfect piece of barbecue.
2. The type of wood chip affects the taste
Big Moe reveals that choosing the right type of wood chip is a must do for all those barbecuing. Among those in competition, they know that each type of wood chip creates a unique smokey flavour and is crucial for creating the right taste for your cut and type of meat.
3. Barbecuing served in competition is not the same as what you’d get in a restaurant
Competition barbecue is a whole other world and most meat served at barbecue competitions are ultra rich with very strong syrup based sauces. Big Moe reveals this is because barbecue competitors create flavours aimed towards what the judges are looking for. Still sounds mouthwatering though!
4. Climate affects cooking
Barbecue competitors know the conditions they cook play a very important role in barbecuing. Big Moe says competition barbecue is very dependent on the climate – humidity, wind and rain can have a big effect on competitors’ cooking and flavours.
5.Barbecuing is a marathon
Big Moe reveals that barbecuing is not a speedy process or even an easy one. It requires constant attention and consistency is key. Moe says consistent turning and basting is reflected in the flavour of the meat and the judges can definitely tell.
6. Rub and marinade flavours are tested
Most barbecue competitors use dry rubs or marinades on their meat, Big Moe let us know that the flavours in each rub or marinade are carefully chosen by the cook. Moe says the flavour profile of the meat is so important, the cook usually tests how these rub flavours will taste with finishing sauces.
Moe Cason 01-2
7. Injecting brisket is a common practice
Big Moe reveals that pitmasters often inject their briskets with a marinade to deliver flavours deep into meat. As strange as this sounds, Big Moe says this is normal and comes in handy during competitions when time is limited.
8. Smoke is an ingredient, not a cooking method
Among barbecue competitors, smoke is not merely a cooking method but rather an ingredient. Big Moe says that the type of smoke can affect the flavour of your meat. For instance, thin blue smoke leaves your meat packed with pure smokey flavours, while black smoke will make your meat taste like a boot.
9. Anyone can be a barbecue judge
Anyone can get involved in the world of competitive barbecue and if cooking isn’t for you, give judging a try. All judges have to do is sit through a short half day judging course with the Australasian Barbecue Alliance and get their accreditation and taste 30 courses of barbecue! Sign us up!
10. Knives should not be overlooked
Big Moe says the right type of knife is critical in getting the perfect piece of meat. Low quality knives can increase the workload and diminish the quality of the final product. Moe also says judges at competitions pay attention to the cut and the presentation of the meat so it’s critical to have a high quality knife.
When & Where: Meatstock @ Melbourne Showgrounds – March 17 & 18 2018
Tickets are available from www.meatstock.com.au and cost $35.00 per day, or $55.00 for a weekend super pass, with children under 12 entering free with every adult.